Top Stories

    Will A Missouri Family Win Millions in Malpractice Suit… Or Much Less?

    The Missouri Supreme Court has been asked to weigh in on whether millions of dollars awarded in a medical malpractice case are or are not subject to the state's $350,000 cap on noneconomic damages, according to an October 21 story in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
    Will A Missouri Family Win Millions in Malpractice Suit… Or Much Less?

    Tele-medicine Can Help Reduce Malpractice Claims

    Researchers set out to answer the question of whether increased spending for potentially unnecessary exams, labs, etc., reduces a physician's odds of being sued for malpractice. The study's findings, published in The BMJ,[1] suggest that increased use of these resources is, in fact, associated with fewer claims.
    Tele-medicine Can Help Reduce Malpractice Claims

    8 Ways To Make Extra Cash As A Doctor

    Whether you're on salary or own your practice, you may have times when it feels like you can't get ahead. Your list of monthly bills probably includes a mortgage and car loans, education debt, money to set aside for retirement, and perhaps kids' tuitions. None of these costs are likely to go away soon. That leaves only one option: You will need to earn more.
    8 Ways To Make Extra Cash As A Doctor

    CDC Issues New Pain Management Prescription Guidelines

    The nation's top federal health agency is urging physicians to avoid prescribing opiates to patients with chronic pain, saying the risks of overdose and addiction far outweigh the benefits for most people. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently announced 12 guidelines for primary care providers regarding prescriptions of opioids, like OxyCotin, Hydrocodone and Vicodin. Doctors are not legally required to follow the guidelines, but such directives often have influence.
    CDC Issues New Pain Management Prescription Guidelines

    Warren Buffett Grows Lead In Million Dollar Bet

    Seven years into a 10-year performance wager, the Berkshire Hathaway CEO is winning easily. Results are in for the seventh year of what’s sometimes called The Million-Dollar Bet—Warren Buffett’s 10-year wager that the S&P 500 would outperform a sampling of hedge funds—and, for now at least, it’s looking like a rout for the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway.
    Warren Buffett Grows Lead In Million Dollar Bet

    With All This Reform, We Need to Keep Our Patients First

    New Jersey ranks near the top in both hospital and health insurance costs, which is why health reform has to put the needs of the consumer first. We need to do everything we can to ensure greater choice, greater consumer awareness and better results, and the new tiered health care networks are an important step in that direction.
    With All This Reform, We Need to Keep Our Patients First

    Features

    New AI Mental Health Tools Beat Human Doctors At Assessing Patients (0)

    New AI Mental Health Tools Beat Human Doctors At Assessing Patients

    About 20 percent of youth in the United States live with a mental health condition, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. That’s the bad news. The good news is that mental health professionals have smarter tools than ever before, with artificial intelligence-related technology coming to the forefront to help diagnose patients, often with much greater accuracy than humans. A new study published in the journal Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, for example, showed that machine learning is up to 93 percent accurate in identifying a suicidal person. The research, led by John Pestian, a professor at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, involved 379 teenage patients from three area hospitals.

    Congress Poised To Pass Sweeping Law Covering FDA And NIH (0)

    Congress Poised To Pass Sweeping Law Covering FDA And NIH

    The bill passed on a vote of 392-26. The Senate could vote on the bill early next week. It has garnered support from a wide variety of advocacy groups, industry lobbyists and the Obama administration. One notable dissident is Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who said her colleagues have "let Big Pharma hijack the Cures bill."

    Investment and Tax

    Health-Care Stocks Skyrocket After Donald Trump Stuns Market With White House Win (0)

    Health-Care Stocks Skyrocket After Donald Trump Stuns Market With White House Win

    You Don’t Need To Spend All Your Money (1)

    You Don’t Need To Spend All Your Money

    Living like you have a limitless supply of money is a good way to ensure that you will always have financial stress in your life. If you learn to carve out 20% or more of your gross income to build wealth each year throughout your career, you may find that you have financial and lifestyle options available to few of your peers.

    Job Market

    Should Doctors Extend Their Practice Hours? (1)

    Should Doctors Extend Their Practice Hours?

    In a world in which consumers book travel, shop and attend school all day, any day of the year, consumer demand for easier access to medical care can come as no surprise. Additionally, the Affordable Care Act adds to the pressure on primary care providers to offer extended office hours. It includes provisions that promote the medical home model, which strives to improve access to primary care in ways that include longer office hours.

    Congress Poised To Pass Sweeping Law Covering FDA And NIH (0)

    Congress Poised To Pass Sweeping Law Covering FDA And NIH

    The bill passed on a vote of 392-26. The Senate could vote on the bill early next week. It has garnered support from a wide variety of advocacy groups, industry lobbyists and the Obama administration. One notable dissident is Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who said her colleagues have "let Big Pharma hijack the Cures bill."

    Marketing

    Drugmakers To FDA: Let Us Share Off-Label Study Data With Payers (0)

    Drugmakers To FDA: Let Us Share Off-Label Study Data With Payers

    Now that pharma has prevailed in free-speech legal battles concerning off-label marketing, it’s pushing the FDA to relax its regulations—and drugmakers believe the first step should involve sharing info with payers. At a two-day public hearing last week, drugmakers told the agency it should allow them to share off-label data with payers, in a move that could further diminish doctors' power over which drugs their patients use.

    Dr. Strange Puts Medical Superhero Myth Under The Stethoscope (0)

    Dr. Strange Puts Medical Superhero Myth Under The Stethoscope

    $80 million opening demonstrates that stereotypes around the profession and its limits are as pernicious as ever. The moviegoing public responds to these tropes for a reason: maybe they recognize the truth behind the special effects? The latest Marvel superhero to hit the big screen actually has a medical degree -- or at least he did before going beyond the limits of science in pursuit of unorthodox treatment.

    Succession Planning

    5 American Cities Where You Can Retire On Just Social Security (0)

    5 American Cities Where You Can Retire On Just Social Security

    The statistics on how unprepared Americans are for retirement can be terrifying. The median retirement account balance is $2,500 for all working-age households and $14,500 for near-retirement households, according to a 2015 study by the National Institute on Retirement Security.

    State-Run Retirement Plans Made Easier Under New Obama Rules (0)

    State-Run Retirement Plans Made Easier Under New Obama Rules

    States and large cities can more easily establish their own retirement programs for private-sector workers under new rules the Obama administration announced Thursday, which are aimed at expanding the number of Americans with access to tax-advantaged savings accounts. The rules may also apply new pressure on financial advisers to lower their fees. “All Americans deserve a secure retirement after a lifetime of hard work,” Jeff Zients, director of the White House National Economic Council, said on a conference call. “Too many Americans reach retirement age without enough savings to supplement their Social Security checks.” One-third of U.S. workers currently have no access to an employer-run retirement savings plan, including half of those at firms with fewer than 50 employees and more than 60 percent of part-time workers as of March 2016, according to Labor Departmentdata. Some state governments have suggested creating savings programs that combine the best features of 401(k)s and pensions to lower costs, provide retirees steadier income and reach workers whose employers don’t offer benefits.

    Wealth Management

    The Middle Class Is Getting Stuck With More Of The Bill For Healthcare (0)

    The Middle Class Is Getting Stuck With More Of The Bill For Healthcare

    While healthcare spending growth isn’t as fast as it has been in the past, who’s footing the bill is changing, the Wall Street Journal writes. And the middle class is coming out on the bottom, according to the publication. More Government Healthcare for the Old and Poor Despite the slowdown, as of June, healthcare spending constitutes 18.2% of gross domestic product, compared to 13.3% in 2000, according to Altarum Institute data cited by the Journal. The government is paying a bigger share with the U.S. population aging and using Medicare, while the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act means more lower-income people get government-subsidized plans on the insurance exchanges, the publication writes. Middle-class families, however, are spending more of their income on healthcare, according to the Journal. While the rich aren’t really concerned about healthcare cost and the poor get help from the government, middle-income families allocated 8.9% of their spending to healthcare in 2014, a 3% rise since 1984 and a larger share than the low- and high-income families, according to a Brookings Institution study cited by the publication. Since the recession of 2007, middle-income families are spending 25% more on healthcare, Brookings senior fellow Diane Schanzenbach tells the Journal. To find the money, middle-class families are dining out less and buying less clothes, according to the publication.

    IRA Investors Need to Think Twice before Investing in Physical Gold, IRS Says (0)

    IRA Investors Need to Think Twice before Investing in Physical Gold, IRS Says

    The Internal Revenue Service isn’t too keen on the recent advertisements suggesting retirement savers store their tax-free individual retirement account funds in gold at their house or in safety-deposit boxes, the Wall Street Journal writes. The statement from the IRS comes in response to a number of ads online and on the radio, such as one from Hartford Gold Group, suggesting investors can avoid stock market turbulence by investing IRA accounts in gold coins and bullion they can store where they like, including their home, according to the Journal. But the law on such practices is cloudy, the publication writes. For example, IRA assets can’t be stored in collectibles such as antiques, gems, artworks or wine, according to the Journal. On the other hand, it’s legal to keep IRA investments in coins and bullion-quality bars in metals such as gold, silver and platinum, the publication writes. But few IRA investment providers offer the option - Vanguard and Charles Schwab don’t allows their clients to invest IRAs in physical metals, according to the Journal.