Top Stories

    Will A Missouri Family Win Millions in Malpractice Suit… Or Much Less?

    The Missouri Supreme Court has been asked to weigh in on whether millions of dollars awarded in a medical malpractice case are or are not subject to the state's $350,000 cap on noneconomic damages, according to an October 21 story in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
    Will A Missouri Family Win Millions in Malpractice Suit… Or Much Less?

    Playing a Doctor on TV: Dr. Oz Works the Camera for Millions

    Once you’re on Oprah’s team of TV doctors, you don’t actually need to chase shady online endorsements to make more money in four years than an elite cardiologist brings down in a working lifetime.
    Playing a Doctor on TV: Dr. Oz Works the Camera for Millions

    Why Can’t Hospitals and Primary Care Get Along?

    The state of the relationship between hospitalists and primary care physicians has hit a nerve. Dr Pegus, director of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Innovation at New York University Langone Medical Center, underscores how two forces reshaping the face of medicine—the rise of hospitalists and the consolidation of outpatient practices into larger heath systems—present an opportunity to enhance care by improving physician communication.
    Why Can’t Hospitals and Primary Care Get Along?

    Tele-medicine Can Help Reduce Malpractice Claims

    Researchers set out to answer the question of whether increased spending for potentially unnecessary exams, labs, etc., reduces a physician's odds of being sued for malpractice. The study's findings, published in The BMJ,[1] suggest that increased use of these resources is, in fact, associated with fewer claims.
    Tele-medicine Can Help Reduce Malpractice Claims

    8 Ways To Make Extra Cash As A Doctor

    Whether you're on salary or own your practice, you may have times when it feels like you can't get ahead. Your list of monthly bills probably includes a mortgage and car loans, education debt, money to set aside for retirement, and perhaps kids' tuitions. None of these costs are likely to go away soon. That leaves only one option: You will need to earn more.
    8 Ways To Make Extra Cash As A Doctor

    CDC Issues New Pain Management Prescription Guidelines

    The nation's top federal health agency is urging physicians to avoid prescribing opiates to patients with chronic pain, saying the risks of overdose and addiction far outweigh the benefits for most people. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently announced 12 guidelines for primary care providers regarding prescriptions of opioids, like OxyCotin, Hydrocodone and Vicodin. Doctors are not legally required to follow the guidelines, but such directives often have influence.
    CDC Issues New Pain Management Prescription Guidelines

    Features

    Hospital Ownership Of Medical Practices Grows By 86% In Three Years (0)

    Hospital Ownership Of Medical Practices Grows By 86% In Three Years

    Hospital ownership of physician practices has increased by 86% in the last three years, according to a new report. The analysis, conducted by healthcare consulting firm Avalere Health and the not-for-profit Physicians Advocacy Institute, found that from 2012 to 2015, hospitals acquired 31,000 physician practices in the U.S.

    Is There Any Way to Remove Money Considerations from Healthcare? (1)

    Is There Any Way to Remove Money Considerations from Healthcare?

    No matter how much some wish healthcare were an altruistic endeavor, it’s a business, Megan McArdle writes in Bloomberg. The reason so many people, on the right and the left, want our healthcare system to exclude the idea of profit is that we intuitively prefer that it were based on altruism, according to the economist Robin Hanson, McArdle writes. But unlike “reciprocal altruism” in a limited scope — say, siblings doing favors for each other with the expectation that those favors would be returned — the healthcare system is much larger beast, involving many strangers rather than intimates, she argues. The issue, therefore, isn’t so much about profit as about having to make choices involving money to pay for the medications and procedures and the people to deliver them, according to McArdle. And the choices involving money aren’t limited to private healthcare, she writes. Even in national healthcare systems, decisions need to be made about the costs of procedures — as well as the benefits relative to those costs, according to McArdle.

    Investment and Tax

    What’s Behind The Sharp Rise In Prescription Drug Prices? (1)

    What’s Behind The Sharp Rise In Prescription Drug Prices?

    Prescription drug prices are skyrocketing in the United States due in large part to government regulations, a new analysis finds. These regulations allow drug manufacturers to charge monopolistic prices that aren’t opposed by competing market forces, the researchers believe. The result?

    IRA Investors Need to Think Twice before Investing in Physical Gold, IRS Says (0)

    IRA Investors Need to Think Twice before Investing in Physical Gold, IRS Says

    The Internal Revenue Service isn’t too keen on the recent advertisements suggesting retirement savers store their tax-free individual retirement account funds in gold at their house or in safety-deposit boxes, the Wall Street Journal writes. The statement from the IRS comes in response to a number of ads online and on the radio, such as one from Hartford Gold Group, suggesting investors can avoid stock market turbulence by investing IRA accounts in gold coins and bullion they can store where they like, including their home, according to the Journal. But the law on such practices is cloudy, the publication writes. For example, IRA assets can’t be stored in collectibles such as antiques, gems, artworks or wine, according to the Journal. On the other hand, it’s legal to keep IRA investments in coins and bullion-quality bars in metals such as gold, silver and platinum, the publication writes. But few IRA investment providers offer the option - Vanguard and Charles Schwab don’t allows their clients to invest IRAs in physical metals, according to the Journal.

    Job Market

    What’s Behind The Sharp Rise In Prescription Drug Prices? (1)

    What’s Behind The Sharp Rise In Prescription Drug Prices?

    Prescription drug prices are skyrocketing in the United States due in large part to government regulations, a new analysis finds. These regulations allow drug manufacturers to charge monopolistic prices that aren’t opposed by competing market forces, the researchers believe. The result?

    Hospital Ownership Of Medical Practices Grows By 86% In Three Years (0)

    Hospital Ownership Of Medical Practices Grows By 86% In Three Years

    Hospital ownership of physician practices has increased by 86% in the last three years, according to a new report. The analysis, conducted by healthcare consulting firm Avalere Health and the not-for-profit Physicians Advocacy Institute, found that from 2012 to 2015, hospitals acquired 31,000 physician practices in the U.S.

    Marketing

    Getting Real About An Alzheimer’s Cure (0)

    Getting Real About An Alzheimer’s Cure

    For decades, people have been hoping for the magic bullet that will prevent, cure, or even slow the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease or other dementias. Yet, despite small hints of progress– and billions of dollars in research–there is no drug, and no app or game, that can successfully treat these diseases. This year, results of these efforts have been decidedly mixed. In the past month, the clinical trial of one highly-touted anti-Alzheimer’s drug failed, the Food & Drug Administration put research on two others on a fast-track review process, and the Federal Trade Commission prepared to send out company-funded rebates to customers who had been duped by a popular brain-training product aimed in part at slowing cognitive decline. The failed drug trial, of a product developed by Singapore-based drugmaker TauRx Pharmaceuticals Ltd, targeted a protein called tau that some researchers believes damages the brains of people with Alzheimer’s Disease. For many years, researchers believed that another protein, called beta amyloid, was the main culprit. After multiple failed efforts to develop a drug based on attacking this protein, a wave of drug firms focused on tau. This trial, at least, found that a drug that targets tau in patients with early to mid-stage Alzheimer’s has no benefit.

    State-Run Retirement Plans Made Easier Under New Obama Rules (0)

    State-Run Retirement Plans Made Easier Under New Obama Rules

    States and large cities can more easily establish their own retirement programs for private-sector workers under new rules the Obama administration announced Thursday, which are aimed at expanding the number of Americans with access to tax-advantaged savings accounts. The rules may also apply new pressure on financial advisers to lower their fees. “All Americans deserve a secure retirement after a lifetime of hard work,” Jeff Zients, director of the White House National Economic Council, said on a conference call. “Too many Americans reach retirement age without enough savings to supplement their Social Security checks.” One-third of U.S. workers currently have no access to an employer-run retirement savings plan, including half of those at firms with fewer than 50 employees and more than 60 percent of part-time workers as of March 2016, according to Labor Departmentdata. Some state governments have suggested creating savings programs that combine the best features of 401(k)s and pensions to lower costs, provide retirees steadier income and reach workers whose employers don’t offer benefits.

    Succession Planning

    America’s Hidden Long-Term Care Problem (0)

    America’s Hidden Long-Term Care Problem

    As Next Avenue has written, long-term care costs are out of reach for most Americans. But here’s something equally painful about long-term care in America: the job of being a long-term care worker. A recent study from researchers at five colleges and universities surveyed 1,708 long-term care workers as well as 1,044 information technology (IT) workers employed at a Fortune 500 firm over 18 months. They wanted to see how the workers compared over time for job strain, burnout, job satisfaction, work/family conflict and psychological distress. The upshot: Even though the IT workers had longer hours than the long-term care workers (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and certified nursing assistants), the jobs of the long-term care workers were “high-strain” vs. the IT workers’ “low-strain” positions.

    State-Run Retirement Plans Made Easier Under New Obama Rules (0)

    State-Run Retirement Plans Made Easier Under New Obama Rules

    States and large cities can more easily establish their own retirement programs for private-sector workers under new rules the Obama administration announced Thursday, which are aimed at expanding the number of Americans with access to tax-advantaged savings accounts. The rules may also apply new pressure on financial advisers to lower their fees. “All Americans deserve a secure retirement after a lifetime of hard work,” Jeff Zients, director of the White House National Economic Council, said on a conference call. “Too many Americans reach retirement age without enough savings to supplement their Social Security checks.” One-third of U.S. workers currently have no access to an employer-run retirement savings plan, including half of those at firms with fewer than 50 employees and more than 60 percent of part-time workers as of March 2016, according to Labor Departmentdata. Some state governments have suggested creating savings programs that combine the best features of 401(k)s and pensions to lower costs, provide retirees steadier income and reach workers whose employers don’t offer benefits.

    Wealth Management

    IRA Investors Need to Think Twice before Investing in Physical Gold, IRS Says (0)

    IRA Investors Need to Think Twice before Investing in Physical Gold, IRS Says

    The Internal Revenue Service isn’t too keen on the recent advertisements suggesting retirement savers store their tax-free individual retirement account funds in gold at their house or in safety-deposit boxes, the Wall Street Journal writes. The statement from the IRS comes in response to a number of ads online and on the radio, such as one from Hartford Gold Group, suggesting investors can avoid stock market turbulence by investing IRA accounts in gold coins and bullion they can store where they like, including their home, according to the Journal. But the law on such practices is cloudy, the publication writes. For example, IRA assets can’t be stored in collectibles such as antiques, gems, artworks or wine, according to the Journal. On the other hand, it’s legal to keep IRA investments in coins and bullion-quality bars in metals such as gold, silver and platinum, the publication writes. But few IRA investment providers offer the option - Vanguard and Charles Schwab don’t allows their clients to invest IRAs in physical metals, according to the Journal.

    Getting Doctors to Focus on Retirement With Free Financial Advisor Consultations (0)

    Getting Doctors to Focus on Retirement With Free Financial Advisor Consultations

    Keeping physicians on track with their retirement planning can be a challenge, but they can be persuaded to pay attention with a little enticement, according to 401kTV. Picking a Plan is One Thing. Picking Investments… It’s not hard to get doctors to choose a provider, Jenna Arruda, an HR business partner at Plexus Management Copr., a healthcare consulting firm, tells the publication. But with their busy schedules, it’s hard to get physicians to focus on going through with the enrollment process, choosing their investments and meeting their contribution schedules, she tells 401kTV. Doctors also aren’t very likely to show up at group meetings, according to the publication. To change their minds, however, Arruda’s group entices them with a free consultation with a financial advisor, 401kTV writes.