screen-shot-2017-02-20-at-3-24-15-pm

Millennial Physicians Unhappy with State of Medicine Yet Determined to Continue Practicing

Commentary on American Medical Association Wire article by Robert Nagler Miller

More than half of Millennial physicians are unhappy with the state of medicine, but the majority want to stay in the field, according to a new survey by the American Medical Association.

Bureaucracy, Regulations and Debt Main Areas of Concern

The survey of 200 physicians 35 and under found that 56% are unhappy, while 34% find the realities of being a doctor less rosy than expected, AMA Wire writes.

Young physicians are particularly unhappy with the work involved outside of treating patients, according to the publication. Bureaucratic issues, dealing with electronic health records, administrative tasks and paperwork, regulations, debt and low pay are some of their main concerns, AMA found.

Finances play a major role in how Millennials doctors chose their career path, meanwhile, according to the survey. Just 15% of respondents are full or part owners of a practice while 80% are employees, AMA found. Medical school debt is making young physicians think twice about striking off on their own, particularly with the prospect of yet more debt and no guaranteed income, the publication writes.

Nonetheless, 83% of Millennial physicians say they’re likely or very likely to soldier on as doctors and another 12% say they’re somewhat likely to continue woking in the field, according to the publication.

AMA also found some generational differences among physicians. Younger doctors, for example, hope to work in related areas, chief among them entrepreneurial pursuits, picked by 42% of survey respondents who were allowed to select more than one choice. Another 41% hope to work as consultants and 34% as hospital or healthcare system executives, the survey found. Fewer than one in five Millennial doctors want to get into academic research, according to AMA.

Millennial physicians also believe they’re better at processing large amounts of data to stay on top of developments in the industry, and are more predisposed to an evidence-based approach rather than one derived from experience, AMA found. They also embrace technology: despite EHRs being among the main causes of concern, for example, 62% of Millennial doctors say they rely on them for doing their job, according to the survey.

The survey also found that 92% of young physicians believe a healthy work-life balance is essential, although just 65% think they’ve reached that point.
Source: American Medical Association Wire

Posted by: The Wealthy Doctor

Permalink: http://wealthy-doctor.com/millennial-physicians-unhappy-with-state-of-medicine-yet-determined-to-continue-practicing

Millennial Physicians Unhappy with State of Medicine Yet Determined to Continue Practicing - overview

Summary: More than half of Millennial physicians are unhappy with the state of medicine, but the majority want to stay in the field, according to a new survey by the American Medical Association.

The survey of 200 physicians 35 and under found that 56% are unhappy, while 34% find the realities of being a doctor less rosy than expected, AMA Wire writes.

Young physicians are particularly unhappy with the work involved outside of treating patients, according to the publication. Bureaucratic issues, dealing with electronic health records, administrative tasks and paperwork, regulations, debt and low pay are some of their main concerns, AMA found.

Finances play a major role in how Millennials doctors chose their career path, meanwhile, according to the survey. Just 15% of respondents are full or part owners of a practice while 80% are employees, AMA found. Medical school debt is making young physicians think twice about striking off on their own, particularly with the prospect of yet more debt and no guaranteed income, the publication writes.

Nonetheless, 83% of Millennial physicians say they’re likely or very likely to soldier on as doctors and another 12% say they’re somewhat likely to continue woking in the field, according to the publication.

AMA also found some generational differences among physicians. Younger doctors, for example, hope to work in related areas, chief among them entrepreneurial pursuits, picked by 42% of survey respondents who were allowed to select more than one choice. Another 41% hope to work as consultants and 34% as hospital or healthcare system executives, the survey found. Fewer than one in five Millennial doctors want to get into academic research, according to AMA.

Share this article: